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Shake What Yo Momma Gave You

March 22, 2013
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pro twerkers

Considering the evolution of the hip-hop culture, these days there’s more dancing in clubs and music videos than there used to be, but instead of Kangol matched with Adidas tracksuits-style dancers, we have krumpers and twerkers.

I played Juicy J’s “Bandz Make A Dance”, AKA’s “Jealousy” and French Montana “Pop That” back-to-back at least a hundred times.  The visuals of the scantily clad ladies were too much to resist. When I took a break, I had another playlist, Swizz Beats featuring Eve “Everyday (Coolin’)”, Khuli Chana and JR’s “No More Hunger” and Blaklez’s “Hush”. All those videos had one thing in common; dancing.

I wish I could dance but its more entertaining to watch other people dance. If you dig into archives you’ll find that dancing has always been an integral part of hip-hop, but back then, hand breaks and the windmill with your head were the in-thing. Hip-hop is a culture that encompasses various elements, and if you look at the core elements of hip-hop, break-dancing is firmly earned itself a spot. That’s pretty much how B-boys and B-girls came about; they spun, flipped and contorted their bodies on the floor to thumping beats.

Considering the evolution of the hip-hop culture, these days there’s more dancing in clubs and music videos than there used to be, but instead of Kangol matched with Adidas tracksuits-style dancers, we have krumpers and twerkers. Is the new school deviating from the roots or is the evolution opening more opportunities to hip-hop dancing?

Each element of hip-hop stands to be profitable in different avenues and dancing is fast becoming a career in music circles. The ability to jiggle and pop-and -lock is now a sought after commodity in the culture. The Relapse performs with Khuli Chana and they are an impeccable group of dancers. Their stellar choreography has earned them the spot to have been featured in a number of dance competitions on TV.  We’ve also seen The Repertoires headline their own reality TV show on Vuzu.

The Reps

The Pro Twerkers have come under fire and praise all at the same time since their infamous performance at Kanye West’s concert in Johannesburg in January 2013.  The ladies jumped on stage, facing away from the crowd who were admiring their jiggling posteriors. Tongues wagged, people ululated while the crew clapped with no hands to the sounds of Juicy J’s “Bandz A Make Her Dance”. The list is endless.

Old school Hip-hop dancing was essentially a collective incorporation of all types of dance, from ballet to jazz, to street dance. Hip-hop has always had the ability to gain something from other forms of dance. So has hip-hop culture lost its roots by bringing in scantily dressed stripper-type dancing? Have we lost the core foundation of what made so many videos timeless and memorable?

Dancing seems to be a key commodity for hip hop and hip hop videos and it’s as though one cannot completely exist without the other, so why do we cry foul play when ladies who flaunt what they’ve got use that as a means to make money? I for one don’t think there’s been much deviation, except for the fact that almost all modern day music videos are similar in their style. So maybe the question should be asked: Has the advertising of women’s bodies in videos removed the conceptual element to it?

The evolution of hip-hop in our modern society is one that is essential to the world; hip hop is one of the biggest genres of world music, but do the videos also play a pivotal role in society? Do you think that the dancing that occurs in these videos influence what we accept in society or not? Does it not then put pressure on females to be the same as those in these videos?

For as long as the culture exists, certain things will be deemed acceptable and others frowned upon. All that’s left to say is, never underestimate the power of hip-hop, to make you accept certain things and to get your body moving.

Written By: @SDotJR_ And @MzLee_