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Mixtape Review: Slaughterhouse – On The House

September 11, 2012
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“With fans heavy-downloading this project looking forward to a taste of what their major label debut through Shady/Interscope would sound like, instead they got their hands on the superior release.”

Less than a week apart, rap collective Slaughterhouse released a mixtape and their highly-anticipated sophomore LP leaked just a few days before the set release date. Risky perhaps to schedule two projects so close to each other, but I believe there was a method to the madness.

“On The House” is a 13-track mixtape laced with underground beats and heavy-lyrical bars. With fans heavy-downloading this project looking forward to a taste of what their major label debut through Shady/Interscope would sound like, instead they got their hands on the superior release.

The House of Slaughter held nothing back on the first half of this offering with hard-hitting punchlines bar-for-bar, and fast-flowing rhymes over mixtape-type beats. And just when you thought they’d laced all their sweat and grime, the second half hits you out of nowhere, and this is where the magic really starts to unfold.

Still not shying-away with their eloquent lyricism, the added vocalists on hooks and lighter beats make for easier listening. There’s no debate as to which track came out tops; the way Crooked I, Joe Budden, Royce Da 5’9, and Joell Ortiz go in on “Truth Or Truth” (the last track on “On The House”) is pure mastery. When 3 Stacks rapped “when sixteen ain’t enough” in his collabo with Rick Ross on “Sixteen” recently, Slaughterhouse took it to heart and each member delivered an astounding 60 bars of insane levels of unfiltered heat; putting some sort of perspective on each of their lives.

The thing about this mixtape though is that although lyrically this is 75-mins of punchlines on steroids, it can be a little overwhelming to a listener that isn’t into that “real hip-hop sh*t”; and if that’s the case I suggest you never listen to Slaughterhouse again because of your inability to appreciate the art in its purest form. And that’s ok. See, it may seem like a lot to process but there’s an undeniable amount of substance in their rhymes. This tape is the most exemplary exhibit of what track-sequencing should sound like. With the last four songs perfectly sequenced, you can feel the impact of a mixtape journey from start to finish that’s drawing to a close.

“Coming Home” is a solid cut. The hook softens the track with a husky-voiced melody, and while the rap verses got that cipher-feel to it, it’s a perfect blend. “Gone” featuring K. Young sounds like it could have been on the album, and although it’s another gloomy production, it’s definitely one of the more memorable tracks. Sampling Jay-Z’s “Dead Presidents II”, “Who I Am” features SLV. This beat is kind of sick, and Joe Budden’s chemistry with SLV is turnt up with Crooked I, Joe Budden, and Joell Ortiz all spitting fire. And then there’s “Truth Or Truth, Pt 1” for the pain, and trust me it makes everything wrong – right.

Unfortunately, despite teaming up with DJ Drama for this Gangsta Grillz special, the only disappointing factor is the beat selection; with very few grabbing your attention.

Written by: Myrna Burgess (@MsTaboo)

“With fans heavy-downloading this project looking forward to a taste of what their major label debut through Shady/Interscope would sound like, instead they got their hands on the superior release.” Less than a week apart, rap collective Slaughterhouse released a mixtape and their highly-anticipated sophomore LP leaked just a few days before the set release date. Risky perhaps to schedule two projects so close to each other, but I believe there was a method to the madness. “On The House” is a 13-track mixtape laced with underground beats and heavy-lyrical bars. With fans heavy-downloading this project looking forward to a taste of what their major label debut through Shady/Interscope would sound like, instead they got their hands on the superior release. The House of Slaughter held nothing back on the first half of this offering with hard-hitting punchlines bar-for-bar, and fast-flowing rhymes over mixtape-type beats. And just when you thought they’d laced all their sweat and grime, the second half hits you out of nowhere, and this is where the magic really starts to unfold. Still not shying-away with their eloquent lyricism, the added vocalists on hooks and lighter beats make for easier listening. There’s no debate as to which track came out tops; the way Crooked I, Joe Budden, Royce Da 5’9, and Joell Ortiz go in on “Truth Or Truth” (the last track on “On The House”) is pure mastery. When 3 Stacks rapped “when sixteen ain’t enough” in his collabo with Rick Ross on “Sixteen” recently, Slaughterhouse took it to heart and each member delivered an astounding 60 bars of insane levels of unfiltered heat; putting some sort of perspective on each of their lives. The thing about this mixtape though is that although lyrically this is 75-mins of punchlines on steroids, it can be a little overwhelming to a listener that isn’t into that “real hip-hop sh*t”; and if that’s the case I suggest you never listen to Slaughterhouse again because of your inability to appreciate the art in its purest form. And that’s ok. See, it may seem like a lot to process but there’s an undeniable amount of substance in their rhymes. This tape is the most exemplary exhibit of what track-sequencing should sound like. With the last four songs perfectly sequenced, you can feel the impact of a mixtape journey from start to finish that’s drawing to a close. “Coming Home” is a solid cut. The hook softens the track with a husky-voiced melody, and while the rap verses got that cipher-feel to it, it’s a perfect blend. “Gone” featuring K. Young sounds like it could have been on the album, and although it’s another gloomy production, it’s definitely one of the more memorable tracks. Sampling Jay-Z’s “Dead Presidents II”, “Who I Am” features SLV. This beat is kind of sick, and Joe Budden’s chemistry with SLV is turnt up with Crooked I, Joe Budden, and Joell Ortiz all spitting fire. And then there’s “Truth Or Truth, Pt 1” for the pain, and…

7.7

CHEKA Digital Rating

Lyrics

10

Beat

4

Flow

9

User Rating : Be the first one !
8

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