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Capture History Now

September 29, 2017
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The conundrum of no deadlines or clocking in on time gave me a space to consume what I possibly couldn’t have in a 9 to 5. Don’t get me wrong, I’m still looking for one but all this time made me realize that time really does fly.

I say this coz in a space of a few months, I’ve seen documentaries like “RD20″ which commemorates “Reasonable Doubt” by Jay Z turning 20 years old. I also watched “Time is Illmatic” which took you through the borough of Queensbridge where the eternal “Illmatic” was born two decades ago. I also got a chance to watch one of my all time fav, Notorious B.I.G, a documentary on his upbringing, his catapult to GOAT and untimely death. This year, the autobiography of Tupac was also released.

It got me thinking, how are we documenting our history? Our living & fallen heroes on the mic. The albums that shifted the plateau of SA hip hop?

Did you know that Khuli Chana’s timeless “Motswako Originator” turns 10 in April of 2018? The unprecedented gold selling magnum opus by acclaimed outfit Skwatta Kamp, “Mkhukhu Funkshen”, turns 15 in 2018? The coin a popular phrase classic “Dankie San” by P.R.O is ten years old.

We have so much heritage in SA hip hop that goes missing in tweets. We don’t have concrete, documented commentary about such phenomenal works in our country.

I was part of a film by Sarah where we spoke about the impact of Cap City. The memories of State Theatre are dear to my heart as much as I’m a J-Sec born and bred. The impact that while movement had on me as a hip-hop fan, the impact it had in how hip-hop in SA is viewed is undisputed.

I say this every year and with more vigour every time, hip-hop is a commodity. We are in a special space where we can be in charge of productions about our dear culture. We can teach and reach. We can show everyone that all this success, all this attention we are now enjoying and shunning away from sometimes, is not an overnight story. Our story is rich.

I’d pay good money to see commentary about Pitch Black Afro’s platinum-selling “Styling Gel”. To see how POC getting banned was a momentous event in SA hip hop.

We create so much for ourselves and the culture and yet there’s little significance to this Mercury like on a Limpopo summer day culture we love.

We have the music. We have the accolades. We have the stars. How about we have BTS of how all this culminated into the biggest grossing culture in the past few years? How about we take a trip down memory lane and comment on how we felt when we saw Skwatta Kamp earn their SAMA? The day “Caracara” took the coveted “Record of The Year”?

If we don’t tell our story, someone else with fewer convictions and love for the culture will tell it for us. It’ll be too late to gripe and moan when we have the chance now.

Written by: SDot

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